MITB Mastering in the box

 49.00

Concepts and applications for audio mastering
Theory and practice on Wavelab Pro 10

SKU: CT9824 Category: Tags: , , ,

Marco Massimi

MITB Mastering in the Box

Concepts and applications for audio mastering – Theory and practice on Wavelab Pro 10

  • ISBN-13: 978-88-99212-18-6
  • Paperback: 550 pages + online
  • Publication Date: 19/10/2020
  • Language: English

Download a demo version of the book in .pdf

You can find this book also at: Amazon US | Amazon UK | Amazon DE | Amazon JP | Amazon CA | Amazon IT

This book deals with digital sound processing for audio mastering, entirely inside a computer, ITB, In the Box. ITB mode has been chosen for various reasons. The computing power of today’s computers allows a high level of accuracy and calculation. These computers are now within anyone’s reach; such a text may help the reader make things that only a few mastering studios, provided with expensive equipment, could have done before. Nowadays, a home studio can produce good masters. If we consider the parameters and take the precautions to avoid degrading the numeric signal, our master can compete, quality speaking, with any commercial product.
Do not be astonished if you find a copy of this book in a mastering studio, however. The purpose of this book is to analyze and experiment with the various elements of this post-production stage. The reader has the tools to analyze the sonic content and make the right choices for the signal processing within a DAW Digital Audio Workstation.

CONTENTS

Foreword by Steve Lyon
Introduction

Chapter 1
PRODUCTION, BACKGROUND HISTORY AND DEFINITION OF MASTERING

  • Music production chain
  • Direct to disc on wax and Bakelite discs
  • Vinyl
  • Transfer
  • Mastering
  • Why master a song?
  • Playback system

Chapter 2
TYPES OF PROCESSING

  • Spectral processing
  • Dynamics processing
  • Time-based dynamics processing
  • Spatial processing
  • Noise reduction

Capitolo 3
METERING

  • dBSPL
  • dBu
  • dBm
  • dBFS
  • Peak meter
  • VU meter
  • Integration time
  • RMS meter
  • AES17 scale
  • KS scale
  • EBU 128 scale
  • LUFS

Chapter 4 
SIGNAL ANALYSIS

  • Acquiring from analog support
  • Acquiring from digital support
  • Arranging project and folders
  • Sample rate and bit depth analysis
  • Floating-point calculations
  • Stereo balance
  • Detecting DC offset
  • Detecting inter-sample distortion
  • Level, volume and dynamic range
  • Crest factor
  • Spectrum analysis
  • 3D FFT analysis

Chapter 5
SIGNAL FILTERING, DC OFFSET REMOVAL AND TIMBRAL CHANGES

  • DC offset causes
  • Removal through an inverted voltage
  • Removal through filtering
  • Equalizers in mastering
  • High-pass filter
  • Low-pass filter
  • Shelving filter
  • Band-pass filter
  • Band-rejection filter
  • Peaking filter
  • Constant-Q peaking filter
  • All-pass filter
  • Equalizers
  • Master section
  • MasterRig plugin

Chapter 6
SPATIAL PROCESSING

  • Analyzing balance and phase correlation
  • Stereo image width
  • M/S spatial processing
  • Mastering reverbs
  • Spatial equalization

Chapter 7
DYNAMICS PROCESSING

  • Downward processors
  • Downward compressor
  • Types of downward compressors
  • Limiter
  • Downward expander
  • Noise gate
  • Ducker
  • Upward processors
  • Upward compressor
  • Upward expander
  • Multiband processors: dynamic equalization
  • Parallel processing
  • Transient designers and time-dependent processing

Chapter 8
DISTORTION AND SATURATION

  • Distortion
  • Saturation
  • Harmonic distortion
  • Multiband distortion

Chapter 9
NOISE REDUCTION

  • Dynamic noise reduction
  • Spectral noise reduction
  • Off-line spectral editing

Chapter 10
M/S MASTERING

  • Serial M/S processing
  • Mastering for vinyl
  • Parallel M/S processing

Chapter 11
STEM MASTERING

  • Mixing vs mastering
  • Acquiring and arranging material
  • Setting up a stem project

Chapter 12
SURROUND MASTERING

  • Multichannel bus
  • Preserving global spatialization
  • Multichannel phase meter
  • Multichannel dynamics processing
  • Multichannel plugins

Chapter 13
DITHER

  • Bit depth reduction
  • Adding noise
  • Noise filtering, noise shaping
  • Noise level

Chapter 14
AUTHORING

  • Vinyl
  • Constant angular velocity
  • RIAA curve
  • CD
  • Why 44.100Hz?
  • Why 48kHz for video?
  • Constant linear velocity
  • SPDIF

Chapter 15
RED BOOK

  • CD structure
  • Tracks
  • Sub-indices
  • P and Q sub-codes
  • Bonus tracks
  • Ghost tracks
  • Emphasis
  • SCMS
  • ISRC
  • UPC EAN
  • CD TEXT
  • Metadata
  • PMCD
  • CD-EXTRA
  • DDP

Chapter 16
MASTERING FOR STREAMING SERVICES AND COMPRESSED FILE FORMATS

  • Mp3265
  • AAC
  • Ogg
  • Flac
  • iTunes
  • Soundcloud
  • Spotify
  • Youtube

Reference texts
Subject index

PREREQUISITES

This book alternates between theory and practice on a computer, which is supposed to be studied in close connection. Users with different levels of knowledge can read this text. The following is the minimum level required for those who start studying MITB: a basic proficiency with a computer (how to save, copy and erase a file); being comfortable with terms such as preamplifier, amplifier, mixer, speakers. Each theoretical section needs to be studied in conjunction with its corresponding practical section, including each computer exercise. You can study this tome either by yourself or under the guidance of a teacher.

FOREWORD

by Steve Lyon

I can’t recall over my various years of being a recording engineer and producer how many times I’ve faced the same question, what is Mastering, and is it required? You would think the answers would be quite obvious and easy, however, as we all know that not really how the conversation ends.
Over the years, the changes are well documented and evident as to our listing habits, from good old Vinyl to streaming with new software in particular ready to assault our ears. The technical requirements have required new solutions to challenges still being fought between the various “platforms” and different mediums. However, the basic outcome across all these are the same, and we just want the music to sound good.
That might seem a little simple in its analysis, but it’s so true. You don’t need to be a technical wizard to enjoy music or to have an opinion on the Genre, it’s content, or it’s sound but to those of us battling to get music heard, develop artists and create something new, reliance on experience, our own or especially on others who work in other avenue’s within music has always been essential.
I have great memories of Mastering in various studios around Europe, especially in the UK and NYC. It would take too long to recall them here, but I absorbed as such as possible from the wildly eccentric engineers to the fanatically technical, appreciating that these personalities had it all within their grasp to make sure the tracks I had brought in the door on tape or digital formats would sound great.
Those possibilities to learn and trust from those experiences are sadly limited now, but the desire to find out more about certain issues is still there, especially the mysteries of mastering. Digital requirements are evolving, Vinyl Mastering is making a reassurance, all good, but where can I find a reference to a vast array of questions and endless curiosity, technical or otherwise? Well, you have it in hand laid out in diagrams and formulas for the technical, discussions, and advice for the curious and a wealth of ideas and insight into what is now generally called “in the box.”
Personal taste and feelings are as important if not better regarded than rules and tech jargon, but wouldn’t it be nice to be assured that you can access all of these in one place.

SUPPORT

Where can I find the “MITB Mastering in the box” support page?

Please check the book introduction: the URL address is reported several times.
Please note that you should type the address exactly as you see it on the book. Don’t use google, type it directly on the browser address bar.